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Hawaii

Seeing Some Familiar Fins

Field Report - Hawaii

The PWF research team recently had a great encounter with a pod of bottlenose dolphins that were hunting fish. Back in the office, we used the bottlenose dolphin photo-identification catalog to reveal some interesting information about the group. As it turns out, this pod contained an adoption animal (#095, “Pa‘ani”), our oldest cataloged animal (#005),…

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FACT OF THE WEEK: False Killer Whales Call Hawaii Home

Fact Of The Week

MORE ON THIS: False killer whales, while a globally distributed species, have a special tie to Maui and the four-island region. Recent research has found that a very small group of this odontocete, or toothed whale species,  calls Hawaiian waters home, making them genetically different from offshore groups. This makes this population especially interesting because false…

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Mugged on the first Ultimate Whalewatch with the Experts of 2015

Eco-Adventures Hawaii

On January 13th, the research team ran the first Ultimate Whalewatch with the Experts cruise of the 2014/2015 whale season. Mother Nature was on our side that day, with perfect calm weather conditions. Over the past week or so, the research team had been sighting more and more humpback whales in Ma’alaea Bay, including mother-calf…

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Sightings of baby spinner and spotted dolphins

Field Report - Hawaii

Recently the research team set out towards the island of Lanaʻi to continue our odontocete and marine debris surveys. Around 9:30 am, we came across a pod of approximately 100 spinner dolphins, including five calves. Even better, two of the calves were neonates: newborn dolphins! A spinner dolphin neonate…

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FACT OF THE WEEK: Hawaii’s State Mammal is Critically Endangered

Fact Of The Week

MORE ON THIS: To native Hawaiians, this furry creature may be referred to as ‘llioholoikauaua, but you personally know them as Hawaiian monk seals. These monk seals are endemic, meaning they are only found in Hawai‘i. They are one of the most endangered animals in the world, with their population of about 1,100 still declining….

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Hawai'i Conservation Conference

Conservation

Today marked the final day of the 22nd annual Hawai’i Conservation Conference, where the “who’s who” of the protection and management of Hawaiian ecosystems descend upon the island of O’ahu to discuss issues such as coral reef health, marine mammal protection, climate change adaptation and building local capacity.

lauren_conference2

I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to exhibit Pacific Whale Foundation’s fishing line recycling program during the conference, and connected with numerous individuals and organizations to help expand this important program throughout Hawai’i.

Fishing line wrapped around a coral head (Maui)

Fishing line wrapped around a coral head (Maui)

Popularized in Florida, fishing line recycling programs are now found throughout coastal states, and represent a voluntary, community-based environmental initiative. Anglers and fishermen are encouraged to not only recycle their line, but to sponsor bins that they (along with their community) will maintain in the future.

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