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dolphin

Seeing Some Familiar Fins

Field Report - Hawaii

The PWF research team recently had a great encounter with a pod of bottlenose dolphins that were hunting fish. Back in the office, we used the bottlenose dolphin photo-identification catalog to reveal some interesting information about the group. As it turns out, this pod contained an adoption animal (#095, “Pa‘ani”), our oldest cataloged animal (#005),…

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All Things Are Possible!

Summer break may be finished, but Ocean Camp memories gust thicker than my Oklahoma accent. As I plug away behind my computer reconciling administrative tasks and reacquainting myself with current events, I can easily become discouraged with the empty nest syndrome of a quieter classroom and the multitude of unjust issues impacting our precious marine…

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Sightings of baby spinner and spotted dolphins

Field Report - Hawaii

Recently the research team set out towards the island of Lanaʻi to continue our odontocete and marine debris surveys. Around 9:30 am, we came across a pod of approximately 100 spinner dolphins, including five calves. Even better, two of the calves were neonates: newborn dolphins! A spinner dolphin neonate…

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Underwater Footage of Whales and Dolphins Interacting

Field Report - Hawaii

If two animals share the same environment, then at some point they are likely to meet. In the wild these meetings are often between predator and prey; however, nature isn’t always so cruel. Some such encounters, referred to as “interspecies interactions,” can be playful or social, where neither individual is threatened. The research team was…

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FACT OF THE WEEK: The Name Game

Fact Of The Week

FACT OF THE WEEK: Bottlenose dolphins may address each other by name! MORE ON THIS: Recent research has suggested that bottlenose dolphins have individually unique signature whistles that are equivalent to human names. During the first few months of life, a dolphin will develop its own signature whistle made up of a series of sounds…

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FACT OF THE WEEK: Can't Touch This

Fact Of The Week

FACT OF THE WEEK: Zoonotic disease Brucellosis found shared between marine mammals and humans.

MORE ON THIS: Zoonotic diseases are those which can be passed between humans and animals. Brucella spp. is the genus of bacteria which causes the zoonotic disease Brucellosis, and can be found in numerous domesticated livestock and wild animals. The Brucella strain in domesticated animals has been eradicated in most industrialized countries, but unfortunately, in developing countries, it is still an issue. The disease has also been found in marine mammals, particularly recorded in dolphins, seals and sea lions. Symptoms in each terrestrial or marine mammal vary, and acquiring the disease can be done by ingesting the bacterium or by touching an open wound.

Spotted dolphin with a lesion

Dolphin with an open wound

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Dolphin in Ma’alaea Harbor

Field Report - Hawaii

The research team did not have to go far on July 3rd to spot a dolphin. There was one swimming around Ma’alaea Harbor! It looked like a sub-adult, meaning it was not fully grown. We photographed it following our protocol, and this week searched for a match within our bottlenose dolphin catalog, but this individual…

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Adopt Pa'ani the "playful" dolphin

Field Report - Hawaii

On Friday, 01/24/2014 at 1:56 pm we had a resighting of Pa’ani, one of the dolphins in our Adopt a Dolphin program. She was part of a pod of seven bottlenose dolphins encountered by our Research Team.

Two of the dolphins were females with their young. Pa’ani had a juvenile dolphin tucked in…

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