Beautiful Day for a Boxing Match

While whale sightings out of Lahaina continue to slowly and steadily decrease with each passing day, competition pods are still at an all time high. For months now we've watched adult Humpbacks duking it out over females, trying their very best to pass on their own genetic material before heading back up to the feeding grounds for several months of gorging.

While each competition pod is exciting, most offer fairly repetitive, predictable behaviors. On occasion however, if you're lucky you'll find two equally matched males that have to get a little creative with their maneuvering to displace the other. This particular pod did just that, not just displaying some highly aggressive moves but some highly aggressive moves above the water column!

As the primary escort would slash its tail fluke, the challenger would \"duck\" out of the way by raising its rostrum clear out of the water (see pic) before falling back into the water column. This bloody battle continued on long past our allotted time with the group and likely lasted for up to an hour or more. While this maneuver happened often, the data recording side of this project unfortunately did not allow me to get good enough video to share with you...

With quite a few weeks left in this season however, I'm bound to get something worth sharing!

Aloha,
Annie

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Beth Salles (visitor) says:

This may be a stupid question and one I probably should know, but, do humpbacks ONLY mate with other humpbacks? has there ever been recordings of them mating with other whales? Was just wondering because of the sighting of the sei whale if they may just mate with other whales. What is your take on the sighting of this sei whale? Are you encouraged that they may be on the incline? You know me. Full of questions lol.

Mahalo Annie

Anonymous (visitor) says:

Hi Annie,

there have been hybrid whales documented around the world but there is not a lot of data. The sei whale that has been seen may have actually been a Bryde's whale. They are found around Hawaii and may be more frequent than we think.

Aloha no

Daniela