Notes From the Field - Hawaii

Visit the New Pacific Whale Foundation Blog

We've launched a new blog which replaces our "Notes from the Field" as of June 2014. 

 

 

 

If you'd like to read our archive of older "Notes from the Field" blog posts, they are archived below. 

Resight of Pa'ani, the "playful" dolphin

Exciting resight of Pa'ani, one of the dolphins in our Adopt a Dolphin program. She was part of a pod of seven bottlenose dolphins encountered by our Research Team.

Two of the dolphins were females with their young. Pa'ani had a juvenile dolphin tucked in next to her who was also seen with her last year.

PWF Research Team Fights Marine Debris

PWF's researchers collected data -- and helped clean up the ocean -- during a research expedition on December 4, 2013.

Traveling on our research vessel Ocean Protector, the team was doing odontocete transects roughly ten miles off Olowalu and collected 45 pieces of garbage, ranging from small pieces of styrofoam to a tire!

In the photos are: intern Chris Bolte (in black), Stephanie Currie (in blue) and Jens Currie (in green).

Pod of Bottlenose Dolphins Documented by PWF Research Team

A large pod of about 20 bottlenose dolphins was documented yesterday by our Research Team. The team was on our research vessel Ocean Protector finishing up a day of odontocete transects, and encountered the pod on their way back to Ma'alaea Harbor.

The team collected photographs for our bottlenose dolphin ID catalog and estimated the pod at 20 individuals, including many calves.

Marine Debris and Man O' War

On October 3, 2013, Pacific Whale Foundation’s (PWF) Maui-based Research Team headed out on Ocean Protector to continue our distribution study of dolphins in the area.  We chose the waters south of the island of Lana`i, an area usually too windy to survey.  There was a slight breeze paired with some swell coming in from the south.

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Comments

Judy Couch (visitor) says:

Ocean is getting polluted. The whole world is getting ready to be destroyed. And we are responsible for this great sin. Oh God forgive us.

Whale season still in ample swing

The weather proved amiable for whale watching Tuesday, as Ultimate Whale Watch guests climbed aboard Ocean Liberty.  They were ardently awaiting the opportunity to appreciate the humpback whales that aggregate around Hawaii for their mating and birthing aspirations each year.  Our astonishing whale watch affirmed that the mating and birthing season is still in ample swing. 

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Comments

mhswabb says:

Thank you for posting these beautiful pictures of whales. I agree that we need to protect the whales and our oceans. Mahalo!

Daniel Brandt (visitor) says:

Please save the whales, many brutal people are killing the whales for money, the navy forces need to be more active in this regards. thanks

Watch Out, Whale About

Pacific Whale Foundation’s (PWF) Senior Research Scientist, Dr. Emmanuelle Martinez, recently held a talk free to the public called “Watch Out, Whales About!

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Exciting Ending Encounter Exceeds Expectations

Tuesday established the Research Department’s fourth Ultimate Whale Watch of the season.  With the recent storm front moving through, we were unsure how the experience would turn out for guests and researchers alike.  After a quick breakfast and research presentation, all Ultimate Whale Watchers headed down to Ocean Liberty to begin our 2 hour whale adventure.  The skies were compact with clouds yet the seas proved smooth.

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Comments

mhswabb says:

I love these photos. Thank you for posting them, I'm looking forward to going on a PWF whalewatching tour soon.

mahalo!

Ultimate Calf Whale Watch

On Tuesday, January 15, 2013, we hosted our second successful Ultimate Whale Watch of the season.  The Porto-catered breakfast helped the guests wake for an early start.  A member of our research staff presented some background information on the humpback whale studies conducted by the PWF Research Team.

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Ultimate Whale Watch

Today marked our first Ultimate Whale Watch this season….and it was Ultimate!!

Guests started with a light breakfast provided by Pacific Whale Foundation’s restaurant, Porto.  This was followed by a presentation by a member of PWF’s research staff, diving into the research PWF is conducting throughout the Pacific on humpback whales.  Guests were then led to board Ocean Explorer, after getting a group photo.  We set off on our whale watch, seeing humpback exhalations sprinkled all around.

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