Annie Macie

Beautiful Day for a Boxing Match

While whale sightings out of Lahaina continue to slowly and steadily decrease with each passing day, competition pods are still at an all time high. For months now we've watched adult Humpbacks duking it out over females, trying their very best to pass on their own genetic material before heading back up to the feeding grounds for several months of gorging.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Beth Salles (visitor) says:

This may be a stupid question and one I probably should know, but, do humpbacks ONLY mate with other humpbacks? has there ever been recordings of them mating with other whales? Was just wondering because of the sighting of the sei whale if they may just mate with other whales. What is your take on the sighting of this sei whale? Are you encouraged that they may be on the incline? You know me. Full of questions lol.

Mahalo Annie

Anonymous (visitor) says:

Hi Annie,

there have been hybrid whales documented around the world but there is not a lot of data. The sei whale that has been seen may have actually been a Bryde's whale. They are found around Hawaii and may be more frequent than we think.

Aloha no

Daniela

The Effort Continues

It has been an absolutely eventful few weeks out of Lahaina Harbor as whales continue to \"surprise\" both our captains and passengers with some extremely close encounters.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Beth Salles (visitor) says:

Hi Annie!! So nice to finally get some "Notes from the Field" from you. Have missed reading about your encounters. I am so happy to see that Maui is having such a great whale season!! Will be interesting to see how long they stay with so many there. It is especially awesome to hear that there are so many Moms with calfs. It will be interesting to see how many of those returning sub adults from last year are mothers this year. Hope your research continues to be helpful for you. Keep the notes coming.

Beth Salles

Annie says:

Aloha Beth,

So good to hear from you!! It has been a while since I've posted but long, full days on the water have tended to soak up most of my time! This year has been a phenomenal season with SO many animals to observe and document, AND we're not even done yet!

I'm so glad you got to make it out to see the whales this year and I'm even happier to have seen you on so many of our cruises! Keep taking those great shots and I'll keep you updated on how the whales are doing here!

-Annie

Close Encounters Continue

While majority of the “Researcher on Board” team has been working hard at collecting valuable data out of Maalaea, I’ve been spending the last few weeks trying to match their efforts with some long hard hours of my own out of Lahaina.

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Annie Macie
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A Final Mahalo

In only six short hours we will be boarding our final flight back to the United States. Equipment is stored, bags are packed, and the team is ready for a little rest and relaxation!

It has been an incredible season and we have an incredible amount to be thankful for. Our members, supporters, family, and friends have been with us from day one, and we cannot thank you enough.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Anonymous (visitor) says:

Safe journey home you three and thanks for all the hard work and dedication. I have really enjoyed this blog the past couple of months and learned so much from it. Wish I could be there to greet you home and talk to you!! Hopefully I will get to catch Annie on one of my many whale watch trips in December. Keep up the great work guys. Mahalo Nui.

Brenda in Delaware (visitor) says:

There has been discussion about the shifting of the poles (North and South poles) and their respective magnetic fields. Are you noticing anything to support that or that would alter the whales behavior, particularly during migration??? Thanks in advance for your insight and observations! Brenda

Beth Salles (visitor) says:

Safe journey home you three and thanks for all the hard work and dedication. I have really enjoyed this blog the past couple of months and learned so much from it. Wish I could be there to greet you home and talk to you!! Hopefully I will get to catch Annie on one of my many whale watch trips in December. Keep up the great work guys. Mahalo Nui.

Nearing the End

Today has marked the last day for our research team on the water the 2010 season. After 85 days in the field we sadly have trailered our research vessel for the last time this year, and have begun preparations for our return back home to Maui. The next four days will be spent driving all our gear north to settle into storage where it will sit for only 9 months before the team is back at it again next year, but just like our equipment we admittedly do need a break. Hands and feet are cold, muscles are exhausted, and minds are set on seeing loved ones back home, but no words can explain the significance of these last three months of research.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Maria Odor (visitor) says:

We visit Maui each February to watch the whales. I sit on the lanai at our condo in Napili and watch the frolicking of the whales. Only swimming with the turtles matches that. Last year I was snorkeling out further than I usually go to see the bat rays, and i heard the whales singing for the first time without any devices. It was so exciting!

Debi C. (visitor) says:

It has been so exciting to read the Pacific Whale Foundation South Pacific research blogs and view the stunning photos/videos. Thank you for sharing your adventure with all of us. It has been a privilege to tag along with you!!

The Letter B is for Barnacle

Each day the team gets a little bit closer to the end of the 2010 Australia field season. With eighty-two days of research down and only eight to go you think we’d have it all figured out by now, yet each day we still wake up to a new sense of adventure and opportunity. At this point in the season moms and calves have moved into the area and feeding behaviors have come to a near standstill. Minor feeding attempts can be observed only on certain occasions, but for the most part when we roll out of bed we know what social groups we’ll be observing that day (mostly mom and calves). What we can’t tell, however, is just how quirky, bizarre, and outside the norm some of the wildlife we encounter will be.

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Annie Macie
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Open For Interpretation

There are only a few scientifically recognized papers in which marine mammals have been identified as “playing” with an object in nature. Animals have often been noted utilizing “tools” supplied by nature for foraging purposes (otters and rocks, dolphins and sea sponges, etc), but how often do they actually just stop and use these objects for play?

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Kathy Huish (visitor) says:

I know stingrays love to swim up under your hand so that your hand brushes across their back (Mote marine Research ray tank), maybe the seaweed feels good, or removes stuff from their skin.

Sharan (visitor) says:

Of course it's "play!" What else could it be! Great pics and great video. Thanks!

The Elements of Nature

For the past few days, the research team has been holed up in the safety of the apartment avoiding the high seas at just about any cost. Extreme wind and sea conditions had driven even the most experienced cargo-ship driving mariners into the safety of the bay to avoid ugly situations out on the big blue, and a fair wind/weather warning had put a damper on even local travel.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Mel (visitor) says:

Oh wow you guys really got some good pictures and videos. When I was on my trip I was dieing to have a video camera with me. I had my horrible point and shoot that did some really bad pictures. Next time I go I am for sure going to take some nice camera equipment with me. Mel Madison

Anonymous (visitor) says:

Annie you are such an amazing talent! I hope everyone at Pacific Whale realizes what an incredibly gifted person they are lucky to work with. Looking at your work this season, there is no other conclusion but to know you are headed for big things! Thank you for your dedication to these great animals throughout your long journey!

Beth Salles (visitor) says:

Amazing guys. Put the second one on full screen on your computer and feel the power!!!! Takes your breath away. Love to watch them feed. I miss this in Maui.

Feeding Frenzy

Each year September typically marks the beginning of the annual humpback season in Eden, New South Wales. Humpback’s migrating down the coast spend an undefined amount of time grazing through the area, picking up tasty morsels of krill and free floating plankton. Bait balls can be seen at times from miles away, popping at the surface to avoid being consumed by the multiple forms of predation above and below.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Hanna (visitor) says:

Oh my this is so beautiful! I can almost feel the heat of the sun and the mist of the ocean on my face as you take the pictures. Such a beautiful site, this is a bucket list for me. Golden Rule

Anonymous (visitor) says:

not fair miss seeing all of that well maybe next year.now hows it all going at eden at the moment

A Small Town of Epic Proportions

It’s an untold tradition at this point for the research team to arrive into a new research site only to be greeted by the most extreme of wind and sea conditions. Now at our fourth of four research sites, the team has kicked off the last portion of the season with a day of data input and organization.

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Annie Macie
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Comments

Hanna (visitor) says:

Very cool photos, I love how you were able to capture the dolphins. They seem to be very curious. Water seemed to be somewhat calm for you and the slight overcast is nice. The seal seems to have find a great place to sun bathe haha. Golden Rule

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